DESK REVIEWS | 10.02. Has the government been allocating money specifically for dementia research in the last fiscal year? If so, how much was allocated to basic, clinical, social and economic research?

DESK REVIEW | 10.02. Has the government been allocating money specifically for dementia research in the last fiscal year? If so, how much was allocated to basic, clinical, social and economic research?

Yes. The Brazilian government has been investing in dementia research in the last years. By April 2019, the Department of Science and Technology in the Ministry of Health invested a total of U$5,397,116.92 in 66 research projects. However, we do not have access to the amount of money invested in the last fiscal year (Brazilian Ministry of Health, 2019g). At local level, agencies have been financing a number of studies on dementia. For example, the agency FAPESP (based in São Paulo) has allocated 421 scholarships and research funds for dementia research, and when it comes to Alzheimer’s disease, this number rises to 884. However, we do not have information on the corresponding amount of money invested (FAPESP, 2019). It is important to mention that this investment is not FAPESP initiative through specific calls but related to dementia researchers applying for funds.

References:

Brazilian Ministry of Health. (2019g). Pesquisa Saúde. https://pesquisasaude.saude.gov.br/

FAPESP. (2019). FAPESP : Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo. http://www.fapesp.br/

Yes. Please refer to part 10.01.

No, research on dementia or Alzheimer’s or cognitive dysfunction could be identified after going through the publication lists, digital archives, research repositories, and future research agendas of 4 research institutions (Litbangkes, LIPI, AIPI, and DIKTI) (Alzheimer’s Disease International, 2019). In Riskesdas from Litbangkes, there is a category for non-communicable diseases, but it still does not include information on dementia and other cognitive decline conditions. The National Report 2018 from Litbangkes has a chapter on mental health but no specific subsection on dementia. In 2013, DIKTI (Ministry of Research, Technology and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia) sponsored a trial on cognitive stimulation therapy in Indonesia through a scheme dedicated for early-career university lecturers (Komalasari, 2014; Nastiti et al., 2015; Triestuning & Sipollo, 2019).

References:

Alzheimer’s Disease International. (2019). World Alzheimer Report 2019: Attitudes to Dementia. Alzheimer’s Disease International.

Komalasari, R. (2014). Domain Fungsi Kognitif Setelah Terapi Stimulasi Kognitif. Jurnal Keperawatan Indonesia, 17(1), 11–17.

Nastiti, D. A., Khamdiniyati, N., Latisi, M. P., Aprilia, L., & Nessya, I. A. (2015). Pengaruh Senam Poco-Poco Untuk Melawan Dimensia. Psikostudia, 4(1). http://e-journals.unmul.ac.id/index.php/PSIKO/article/view/2268

Triestuning, E., & Sipollo, B. V. (2019). Cognitive Stimulation Therapy on Elderly with Dementia in Panti Werdha Pandaan, Pasuruan. International Conference of Kerta Cendekia Nursing Academy, 1, 139–144.

The government has not been allocating money for dementia research. However, there are research groups in health institutions and universities, mainly. In addition, federal and state level institutions, including the National Institute of Health, public hospitals, etc. can plan, budget, and allocate funds for research in any topic related to their mission, and as such, they could allocate funds to dementia research if they chose to. An overview of dementia research in Mexico shows that it has been increasing in recent years, mainly focused on clinical and intervention aspects, following those of an epidemiological nature, evaluation of informal care and the impact of the caregiver. However, there is little research on the effectiveness of interventions, the impact of dementia, as well as on other areas such as attitudes and stigma.